Monday, October 26, 2009

Daylight Saving Time: Fall 2009


So, when exactly do we reset our clocks? And is it forward or backward one hour?

Daylight Saving Time can be very confusing. Read below to help end your confusion! [The chart on the left plots the times of sunrise and sunset (with DST adjustment as separate lines) in Greenwich, GB for 2007. -from WikiMedia Commons]

Short answer
: On Sunday, 1 November, 2009 at 2:00am, you should set your clock backward one hour to 1:00am. (Remember "spring forward, fall back...").

Easy answer: Most people who go to bed earlier than the wee hours of the morning simply set their clocks back one hour before they go to bed on Saturday, October 31st.

Detailed answer: Go HERE.


For more information...
Daylight Saving Time from WebExhibits

World Clock for Indianapolis DST

National Geographic on DST

US Naval Observatory on DST

Figure out what time it is in the United States at Time.gov

Wednesday, September 16, 2009

H1N1 update

Ball State:
Pandemic Flu Information (BSU Administration)

Number of reported cases (Daily News, 11 Sep. 09)

Three flu cases found at Ball State (The Star Press, 10 Sep. 09)

Swine flu vaccines to be available in October (Daily News, 14 Sep. 09)


Indiana, United States, & World:

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 (World Health Organization)

CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu (US Centers for Disease Control)

H1N1 Influenza Center (New England Journal of Medicine)

2009 H1N1 Influenza A (Indiana.gov)

H1N1 vaccine information (US Dept. of Health & Human Services)

Vaccine development & testing (CDC National Vaccine Program Office)

How are vaccines made? (Children's Hospital of Philadelphia)

Hand-washing is no defense against H1N1 (Newsweek)


For more information
on the H1N1 or "swine flu" virus, read the previous SHSL blog entry .

Monday, August 24, 2009

Printing charges at University Libraries


Effective Monday, August 24, 2009

The following BSU groups will have a free print quota of 1,000 exposures each semester:
• Undergraduate students
• Faculty and staff
• Doctoral and graduate students
• Indiana Academy students

An exposure is 1 side of 1 sheet of paper.

When the semester’s quota is reached, you will be charged 5¢ per exposure via the Bursar’s Office, billed at the end of the semester. Check your print balance at any time via the link on the Libraries’ home page.

Users with guest accounts may print no more than 20 pages per day.

Questions? Ask at any service counter.

Monday, July 20, 2009

One small step 40 years ago


Today marks 40 years since humankind first set foot on Earth's moon.

NASA plans to return humans to the moon in the near future. Read more at "Why the moon?"



Find out more by following the links below:

SHSL blog: 38 years ago today...

Transcript of Neil Armstrong stepping onto the lunar surface (says famous line at 109:24:48)

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) views Apollo landings site seen from lunar orbit

Watch a live news conference from NASA headquarters on the Apollo 40th anniversary at NASA TV at 9:30am today

40th Anniversary NASA Events List

Wednesday, July 01, 2009

Laptop printing updated









Print from your laptop (or any computer) to certain print release stations in the University Libraries.

You can print from anywhere that you have an internet connection. In other words, you can print to one of the Libraries printers from you wireless laptop on- or off-campus and from you desktop computer at home. If you can access the Libraries website, you can print to the University Libraries.

Here's how:
  1. Go to http://libprinteron.bsu.edu/cps/
  2. Enter your BSU email address to login
  3. Select a print release station
  4. Click on Browse to select the file you want to print. Click on Submit.
  5. Select page setup options. Click Continue.
  6. Wait while your job is processed. When the green bar appears, your print job is ready to be printed at the release station you indicated.
For more information read the Wireless Printing FAQ.

NOTE:
  • You do not have to be in one of the Libraries (or even on campus) to print.
  • Print jobs time-out after 90 minutes.

Tuesday, April 28, 2009

Swine flu (H1N1 influenza virus)

Swine flu cases are in the news right now and seem to be increasing in number. As of 9am Sunday (26 April 2009), the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) had confirmed 20 cases in California, Kansas, New York City, Ohio and Texas. There are no confirmed cases in Indiana at this time. Today, more cases have been reported across the globe, including one confirmed case in Israel. Depending on which reports you read, this puts the confirmed cases between 50 and 150 with some deaths in Mexico potentially resulting from this illness.

The photo to the left is an electron micrograph of the swine influenza virus. Below to the right is a schematic of an influenza virus.

---
How serious is this?
Is there reason to worry?

Find out more information from the links below
:

National Library of Medicine: Swine Flu information page with links to the CDC and World Health Organization (WHO)

Health News Blog resources: A comprehensive resource for finding out everything you need about the H1N1 influenze virus (aka the swine flu)

Swine flu news

Overviews from ScienceBlogs Aetiology and Effect Measure

"The Sky is Falling: An Analysis of the Swine Flu Affair of 1976"

"1976: Fear of a great plague"

"History Says Avoid Virus Hysteria"

Influenza pandemic of 1918-1919 from the US Dept. of Health & Human Services

Newsweek article: Hand-washing is no defense against H1N1

Tuesday, April 14, 2009

Christy Woods wildflower walks


A brief guide to spring blossoms on Ball State campus…

FSEEC Wildflower walks in Christy Woods
Learn about wildflowers with John Taylor Saturdays throughout April. You can purchase a Field Guide to Christy Woods from the Field Station and Environmental Education Center's (FSEEC). View an online map of available parking. For more information, contact the FSEEC at (765) 285-2641.


Map of cherry blossoms on Ball State campus

This map (.jpg) was created by Graduate Assistant Sang-Seuk “Jack” Yun from the Geospatial Center and Map Collection in 2004. View page 7 of the April 2004 issue of the Library Insider for more information.


Wildflower books at University Libraries
Here's a useful list of books (.rtf) that can be found in the University Libraries about wildflowers obtained by searching CardCat with keywords such as “wildflowers,” “flowers,” “flora,” etc.

Tuesday, March 03, 2009

Daylight saving time: Spring 2009


So, when exactly do we reset our clocks? And is it forward or backward one hour?

Daylight Saving Time can be very confusing. Read below to help end your confusion! [The chart on the left plots the times of sunrise and sunset (with DST adjustment as separate lines) in Greenwich, GB for 2007. -from WikiMedia Commons]

Short answer
: On Sunday, 8 March, 2008 at 2:00am, you should set your clock forward one hour to 3:00am. (Remember "spring forward, fall back...").

Easy answer: Most people who go to bed earlier than the wee hours of the morning simply set their clocks back one hour before they go to bed on Saturday, March 7th.

Detailed answer: Go HERE.


For more information...
Daylight Saving Time from WebExhibits

World Clock for Indianapolis DST

National Geographic on DST

US Naval Observatory on DST

Figure out what time it is in the United States at Time.gov

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Darwin Day & 200th Anniversary of his birthday

Charles Robert Darwin: b. 12 Feb, 1809 – d. 19 Apr, 1882

February 12th is Darwin Day. A day of celebration initiated by Darwin Day.org, a science education group, advocating the celebration of science- "our most reliable knowledge system."

Darwin Day 2009 also marks the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birthday.

Want to know more?
Click here (PDF) for a selection of articles, books, videos, and online resources about Darwin, natural selection, and evolution.

OR follow these links:

Thursday, January 15, 2009

Wind chill factor facts



Whenever temperatures plummet television meteorologists warn of extreme wind chill.

But what is wind chill? Does it really get colder when the wind blows? Will wind chill freeze water? Can you get frostbite if the air temperature is above freezing? The answer to all of these questions is no.

We might feel colder when the wind blows because of heat loss due to evaporation and heat transfer from our skin to the air but wind chill is a subjective feeling or sensation of cold not an actual drop in air temperature. If you keep your exposed skin to a minimum and wear wind-blocking clothing then you should stay warm. It is this subjective feeling along with the increased risk of frostbite that wind chill attempts to approximate.

However, wind chill pronouncements by weather forecasters often are read with a finality they do not have. Wind chill depends not only on air temperature but wind speed and that can vary quite a bit. Saying the wind chill today is -17F is misleading because the wind and air temperature will vary throughout the day. What they are usually quoting is an average air temperature and wind speed. In other words, an approximate middle point for reference only rather than an absolute value.


So, when the weather person on the local TV news warns about negative wind chill it does not mean that the air temperature is that cold. It means that they want to, as Daniel Engber said, “put an exclamation point on the banality of winter.”

More Information & References





Ball State Information & Resources

  •  keywords: thermal equilibrium, radiative transfer, climate physics, climatology
    •  Call numbers: QA3, QC861.3
  • keywords: frostbite, hypoxia, ischemic injury, reperfusion injury
    • Call numbers: QH653, QH671, RB144.5 
General information
Frostbite

Research articles, etc.
  • Eagan, C. (1964). Review of research on military problems in cold regions. C. Kolb and F. Holstrom eds. TDR-64-28. Arctic Aeromed. Lab. p 147–156.
  • Osczevski, R. Wind chill: Whole body vs. facial cooling. DCIEM TR 2000-089, Nov. 2000
  • Osczevski, Randall and Maurice Bluestein. The New Wind Chill Equivalent Temperature Chart. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, Oct. 2005, p. 1453–1458.
  • Siple, Paul, quoted in: Cold Injury, 1958, Steven Horvath editor, Josiah Macy Foundation, p 216.
  • Woodson, Wesley E. (1981). Human Factors Design Handbook, page 815. McGraw-Hill. ISBN 0-07-071765-6
  • Tikuisis, P., and R. J. Osczevski (2002) Facial Cooling During Cold Air Exposure. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc. July 2003, p. 927–934
Updated 12/14/2016